Photo of ash tree in Historic east pasture

Remove Emerald Ashborer-damaged Ash trees from pasture and Legacy garden areas; remove dying apple tree in Lincoln Home backyard

Lincoln Home National Historic Site » Remove Emerald Ashborer-damaged Ash trees from pasture and Legacy garden areas; remove dying apple tree in Lincoln Home backyard » Document List

Six Ash trees in the northeast pasture area and Legacy Gardens area on the east side of the park have been badly damaged by the Emerald Ash Borer too much to be saved and need to be removed for safety and environmental reasons. The trees are near walkways and streets that are heavily used and they are large trees that could cause heavy damage if branches break off or the tree falls. Because these trees are outside of the area covered in the Cultural Landscape Plan and the pasture/garden area is not heavily used by visitors, these trees will be cut down and the stumps ground out to eliminate further infestation, but they will not be replaced with other trees in the immediate future.

The apple tree in the Lincoln Home backyard (possibly a Braeburn) was planted in the early 1990s to meet the cultural landscape plan and historical research and photographs of the Lincolns having at least two apple trees in their backyard. The tree was not maintained and was allowed to grow too tall. An attempt at pruning it in 2017 resulted in over-pruning and the loss of two large limbs that summer. Since then, the tree has continued to deteriorate to the point where it is now a hazard and may fall over or have large limbs break off in a moderate wind/storm. Its location near the heavily-used backyard boardwalk creates a safety hazard for the 275,000 visitors touring the Lincoln Home annually. It will be cut down, the stump ground out, and an heirloom apple tree will be planted in its place. The tree will be included in a new schedule of tree maintenance the park will be contracting with a local arborist.

Contact Information

Jason Taylor, 217-391-3235