National Park Service
PEPC Planning, Environment & Public Comment
PEPC Home Documents by Park Policy/Links Park Planning Search Documents
  • (non-NPS links)
Spirit Mountain

Wilderness Management Plan/Environmental Impact Statement

Lake Mead National Recreation Area » Wilderness Management Plan/Environmental Impact Statement » Document List

You Are Now Leaving

parkplanning.nps.gov

National Park Service

Please note: The National Park Service does not control and cannot guarantee the relevance, timeliness or accuracy of the materials provided by other agencies or organizations, nor does the NPS endorse other agencies or organizations, thier views, products or services.

February 26, 2015

Dear Friends of Lake Mead National Recreation Area and the Southern Nevada District Office of the Bureau of Land Management,

We are pleased to present the final Wilderness Management Plan/Environmental Impact Statement for eight wilderness areas within and adjacent to Lake Mead National Recreation Area. The plan was jointly prepared by the National Park Service and the Bureau of Land Management as three of the eight wilderness areas include public lands administered by the Bureau of Land Management. The plan is the culmination of several years of effort involving the thoughtful input and participation of hundreds of individuals, many public agencies and numerous outside organizations and stakeholder groups.

The new plan/environmental impact statement presents and analyzes three alternatives for future direction of the management and use of eight wilderness areas in the Park and on adjacent Bureau of Land Management lands. The three alternatives vary primarily in the level of public access and degree of management. Alternative B, the agencies' preferred alternative, focuses on protecting the character of the wilderness areas while providing a few more opportunities for access into several areas.

In the preferred alternative, climbing and bouldering would continue to be permitted in all wilderness areas. Temporary or removable equipment would be encouraged. The placement of new fixed anchors and equipment in all NPS wilderness would require authorization from the superintendent and be in compliance with Director's Order 41(Wilderness Stewardship). The placement of new fixed equipment would be prohibited in the Spirit Mountain Wilderness and existing equipment would be removed in partnership with the local climbing community where removal does not damage the rock face. In the Bridge Canyon Wilderness, the number of intensively bolted face climbs would be reduced and the replacement of existing anchors and equipment would require authorization from the superintendent. The park staff will work with the local tribes and climbing community in the pursuit of reducing the number of intensively bolted face climbs.

Lake Mead National Recreation Area and its adjacent public lands have become a recreational destination for over six million visitors per year due primarily to the spectacular setting and variety of recreational opportunities available. We sincerely thank those who have helped shape the Wilderness Management Plan and we invite all friends of Lake Mead National Recreation Area and the adjoining public lands to join us in bringing the vision of the plan to fruition.

Sincerely,

Patrick Gubbins
Acting Superintendent
Lake Mead National Recreation Area

Erick A. Kurkowski (Acting)
District Manager Bureau of Land Management
Southern Nevada District Office


Contact Information
Greg Jarvis, Project Manager, National Park Service, 12795 W Alameda Parkway, Denver, CO 80225 (303-969-2263)